Talk the Talk
A Guide to Hunter & Jumper Terms

Hunters are judged on the horse’s movement, presence, manner of going and jumping ability.

Equitation classes are judged on the rider’s position, ability, and poise.

Jumpers are judged on speed, time, and athletic ability over fences. Faults are given for time or knocking down a pole, not jumping, or not clearing an obstacle.

Divisions are the different categories of hunter or jumper classes. They can be based on a horse or rider’s age and/or number of years showing, a rider’s age and status (amateur vs. professional), a horse or pony’s height, or (for jumpers) amount of prize money won.

Over Fences describes a class in which a horse or rider is judged over a course of eight or more obstacles.

Under Saddle describes a class in which a horse or rider is judged at the walk, trot, and canter, going both ways of the ring. Multiple riders compete at the same time in the ring during the Under Saddle class.

Hunter Classic defines a class of two jumping rounds with the scores added together to produce the final pinning (awarding) of the class. Each horse does one round which is scored; then the top fifteen horses with the highest first-round score are invited back to ride a second round.

Hunter Derby defines a class of two jumping rounds with the scores added together to produce the final awarding of the class. The first round requires a minimum of ten obstacles, including one in-and-out, one bending line, and one unrelated distance. Obstacles should resemble those found in the hunt field, such as post and rails, brush jumps, banks and ditches or water obstacles. The top twelve horses are invited back to perform a “Handy” round, which may include a walk or trot fence or opening a gate, in addition to emphasis being made and more points being given for successfully negotiating tighter turns or taking more direct, or “handy” routes from one jump to the next.

Rated/recognized
shows are shows run in accordance with United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) rules and regulations and at which winners’ points are tallied and accumulated towards end-of-year high score awards. Shows are rated from AAA to C depending on the number of points that are given.

Local/unrecognized shows are shows operated on a local or regional club level or by independents. They may be sanctioned by such a club (such as the Baltimore County Horse Shows Association) or by no club at all.

Levels refers to the height of the jumps in a jumper class. For instance, Level 2 is 3’3”. In general, levels increase by 3” increments.

Tables refer to the way a jumper round is scored. For example, Table II, Section 1 is called a “Time First Round” class where there is only one round with the fastest fault-free round winning. For a complete list of Tables, visit the Hunter & Jumper Blog on equiery.com.

The USEF defines its competitors as:

Adult or senior: an individual who has reached his 18th birthday as of December 1 of the current competition year (except for dressage or combined training).

Junior: an individual who has not reached his 18th birthday as of December 1 of the current competition year. Persons born on December 1 assume the greater age on that date.

Classes for specified individuals
(instead of specified horses) are: Children’s and Junior classes, although both for individuals under 18, vary in the height of the jumps, and riders in the Children’ s divisions many not cross-enter into the Junior divisions at the same horse show.

Amateur classes are restricted to amateurs as defined by the USEF. Amateur/Owner classes require the rider to be the owner (or member of the owner’s family) of the horse. Leased horses are not eligible for Amateur/Owner classes.